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Auschwitz Exhibition Reopens in September And Extends its Stay in New York Until May 2, 2021

Auschwitz Exhibition in New York

Auschwitz Exhibition Reopens in September And Extends its Stay in New York Until May 2, 2021

 
•      Auschwitz Exhibition plans to open its doors on a reduced schedule on September 13—pending State and City approval.
•      The exhibition will extend its stay in New York City through May 2, 2021.
•      Timed tickets available once Museum is authorized to reopen. You can sign up here to learn when tickets are on sale

New York, NY – As New York enters the next phase of reopening amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust , where the “Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away” is hosted, announced plans to reopen its doors—pending City and State approval—on a reduced schedule on September 13. Moreover, Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away. has extended its stay in New York City through May 2, 2021.

Auschwitz Exhibition Extended

After welcoming more than 165.000 visitors since its opening in New York, the traveling exhibition extended its stay in New York at the Museum of Jewish Heritage until May 2, 2021.

“First and foremost is the safety of our visitors and our employees,” says Jack Kliger, President & CEO of the MJH. “As people venture out again seeking educational experiences in safe public places, museums such as ours are uniquely qualified to welcome them back. We also recognize that many people had purchased tickets to see Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away. before it was due to close this year and are pleased to announce that we have arranged for the exhibition to remain with us through May 2, 2021.”

“We are extending this exhibition because it offers clear, moral lessons that resonate powerfully today, particularly amid a rise in antisemitism across our country, and from which visitors want to learn,” says Bruce C. Ratner, Chairman of the Museum’s Board of Trustees. “Combatting antisemitism lies at the core of the mission of the Museum because one cannot understand the history and impact of the Holocaust without understanding antisemitism. The surge in antisemitic incidents in our country not only heightens the urgency of our work, but also compels each one of us to challenge hate in all of its forms.”

Reduced Schedule

The Museum plans to open three days per week, and with limited hours: Wednesdays, Thursdays and Sundays from 10 AM to 5 PM.

General admission, timed-entry tickets will allow access to all Museum galleries and be available at a limited capacity –at 25% of the Museum’s previous capacity– to maintain proper social distancing. On the other days, the Museum will deep clean all public spaces. Timed tickets will be available once the Museum is authorized to reopen.

Health and Safety Measures

The Museum is developing protocols to comply with City and State guidelines to ensure the health and safety of visitors and employees, including limiting capacity in the galleries to ensure social distancing, timed admission tickets that must be purchased online, and requiring all visitors and staff to wear masks.

Additionally, floor markers and other signage will be placed throughout the facility to direct visitors on how to maintain social distancing. Hand sanitizer stations will be available throughout the Museum. Masks will be provided to any visitor who does not have one.

Visitors will be encouraged to use their own smartphones and earphones to access the Auschwitz exhibition’s audio guide (which is available in multiple languages), though the Museum plans to have earphones available for purchase, as well.

While in-person group tours will not be available, virtual tours, including of the Auschwitz exhibition and gallery visits for adult and student groups, will be launched in September.